The Florida TLSAE Course There are a few different reasons as to why a person would take the Florida TLSAE course and we will discuss those reasons thoroughly in this article. The TLSAE course is a 4-hour Florida Traffic Law and Substance Abuse Education course. 

Learner’s Permit

In order to receive your driver’s learners permit, Florida requires a new driver to take and pass a TLSAE drug and alcohol course. 

Driver’s License

Before you can become a licensed driver in the state of Florida, you must take and pass a drug and alcohol TLSAE course.   

Court Ordered

Drivers who are convicted of violating certain Florida traffic laws, such as driving under the influence of alcohol or drugs, will be court ordered to take and pass a TLSAE course. In most cases, when a driver is convicted of driving under the influence, their license will be suspended. Taking and passing the TLSAE course will allow a driver with a suspended license, to apply for what is called a ‘hardship’ license.  A hardship license will allow a suspended licensed driver to drive to places such as work, church, school or medical appointments.   

Course Requirements

First time drivers looking to earn their learner’s permit and driver’s license, must take the Florida TLSAE course. The course is designed to teach new drivers about Florida driving laws, responsibilities, safe driving and how to be alert and cautious while driving. In addition, the course covers the importance of why a driver should never get behind the wheel of a vehicle under the influence of drugs or alcohol.  You must be at least 14 years of age in order to take the TLSAE course and at the age of 15, you can apply for your learner’s permit. Once the course is taken and passed, you will receive a certification of completion and your passing results will be automatically sent to the Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles.    The course is online, so you will need an internet connection in order to take the course. You can start and stop the course at will and learn at your own pace.   

DUI Laws and Penalties In Florida

Throughout the United States, the penalties for driving under the influence will become great with each conviction. The state of Florida is no exception. 

First D.U.I. Conviction

When you are convicted of your first D.U.I. offense in Florida you will receive a fine between $500 and $1,000 and up to six months in jail. If you happen to have a high blood alcohol level over .015 of if there was a minor child in the vehicle, you will be fined between $1,000 and $2,000 and up to 9 months in jail. 

Second D.U.I. Conviction

In Florida, it doesn’t matter how long the timeframe was between your first conviction and the second, you will still have higher penalties for a second D.U.I. conviction. You will receive a fine between $1,000 and $2,000 and up to 9 months in jail, in addition you will be required to put an interlock ignition device in all vehicles that you operate. This device makes you blow into it prior to driving, if the device detects alcohol in your system, your vehicle will not start. 

Third & Fourth D.U.I. Conviction 

At this point, if you are convicted of a third or fourth D.U.I. It is considered a felony offense in Florida if it has been less than 10 years since your second conviction.  Convicted within 10 years of your second D.U.I. you will receive a fine between $2,000 and $5,000 and mandatory jail time of 30 days. You will also have to have an interlock ignition device installed in your vehicle for two years.  Convicted after it’s been 10 years since your second conviction, you will receive a fine between $2,000 and $5,000 and up to 12 months jail time. You will also have to have an interlock ignition device installed in your vehicle for two years.  Your fourth conviction will come with a $2,000 minimum fine and up to 5 years in jail. In addition, you will have an interlock ignition device installed in your vehicle for 5 years.  Taking the TLSAE course can greatly reduce the risk of a driver ever being put in a situation where they are convicted of a D.U.I. offense.